npr:

The tech giant has launched a new tool for teachers. “Google Classroom” is paperless, and integrates with the rest of Google’s apps, like Google Docs. 
While it’s too soon to tell how Classroom will be received, Google Apps for Education is already changing how early adopters teach — and raising some important questions about the transition to tech-enabled classrooms.
Is Google’s Free Software A Good Deal For Educators?
Illustration credit: LA Johnson/NPR

npr:

The tech giant has launched a new tool for teachers. “Google Classroom” is paperless, and integrates with the rest of Google’s apps, like Google Docs. 

While it’s too soon to tell how Classroom will be received, Google Apps for Education is already changing how early adopters teach — and raising some important questions about the transition to tech-enabled classrooms.

Is Google’s Free Software A Good Deal For Educators?

Illustration credit: LA Johnson/NPR

Oh my God, what if you wake up some day, and you’re 65, or 75, and you never got your memoir or novel written; or you didn’t go swimming in warm pools and oceans all those years because your thighs were jiggly and you had a nice big comfortable tummy; or you were just so strung out on perfectionism and people-pleasing that you forgot to have a big juicy creative life, of imagination and radical silliness and staring off into space like when you were a kid? It’s going to break your heart. Don’t let this happen.
— Anne Lamott (via creatingaquietmind)
The kid read books like he was engaged in some sort of scavenger procedure, scowling in concentration, turning pages at improbable speed while he flayed away the inessential flesh of prose and inspected the skeleton of the story, the bare facts or crucial nonsense. Dylan Ebdus didn’t read, he filleted.
— The Fortress of Solitude; Jonathan Lethem (via eileenssummerreadinglist)